Blog | Employee Incentive Information | Performance Management | Divvy

Why marketing needs employee engagement

When examining notable Chief Marketing Officers like Marissa Riccardi, Michael Lazerow, Eileen Zicchino, Simon Clift, Pamela Kaufman, Terri Graham, and so many others, a common understanding is shared. Employee engagement dramatically affects the success of building your brand.

“When it comes to clients, it’s all about trust,” notes CMO Eileen Zicchino. “When we look at our brand attributes, it’s about character, intelligence, and strength. Our employees help us put the client first. Our workforce works very closely with them which, in turn, builds our brand. It must be about relationships and trust even if it means we have to turn away business.”

The promise your brand makes to customers is powerfully delivered through the behaviors of your workforce. They are your brand ambassadors. With every move, they represent your brand and they are what differentiates you in the marketplace. All the advertising dollars in the world can proclaim how great your products are or how customer-focused your company is but it’s not enough. How your receptionist answers the phone, how accessible your customer service hotline is, and how well you serve the interests of your clients is what ultimately wins and retains customers.

Properly identifying what makes your brand valuable while helping employees to live and breathe your brand promises will result in superlative employee and customer experiences. That’s what you want.

The focus then becomes how best to collaborate with your employees to match brand values with your customer requirements. What are your strengths? What are you excellent at? What is innovative about you? Are you delivering on your promises? Does your workforce enthusiastically advocate for your brand’s message?

Topics: Employee Engagement Employee Recognition employee training Results Suggestion Programs Employee Incentive Programs Social Engagment Tools Employee ideas Chief Marketing Officer CMO marketing

How to hire and retain a sales champion

Behind every company’s increase in market share there is at least one sales champion. They’re people who understand human needs, communicate clearly, and know how to gain a buyer’s trust. Some sales champions have gone on to become very successful business owners and teachers. Great sales people are made. Anyone can become successful in selling. All it takes is the right training. Right? Maybe—but it’s not as simple as that. To make it in sales (or anything else), you must bring a big desire and a clear reason for wanting to become a salesperson.

Unfortunately, employers often overlook these inner ingredients during the hiring process. Many sales managers still make the mistake of hiring a salesperson because they were swayed largely by their resume, looks, dress, and talk. They believe this is all that is necessary to mold them into a grand producer. With just a little training, you can send them off to conquer the marketplace. When minimum emphasis is placed on what’s behind the nice suit and smooth talk, you will shoot yourself in the foot. The interview process should be your opportunity to get a holistic picture before signing them on.

How can you use the interviewing process to better know if the person sitting across from you has those inner traits necessary to make a good candidate? If great sales people are made, this does not override your responsibility as a manager to conduct a thorough and complete interview. Lacking certain basic intrinsic ingredients will guarantee that your potential sales rockstar will fail and quit soon after. And turnover is time-consuming and costly for your company.

Advances in communication and social media technology can give your sales team incredible access to analytics on your prospect’s behavior, interests, and needs. It’s useful information that can result in creating different sales strategies—strategies that can even produce higher conversion rates. However, relying mostly on analytics as your assurance to close a sale or keep a customer loyal is a trap.  

The art of selling is simple but demands superlative care and persistence. Selling is very rewarding and profitable but it’s hard work. Speak with any experienced, successful salesperson and they will tell you that without these “internal” qualities, disappointments and failures will end your career quickly. Sales success requires a deeper motivation. Sales training then becomes easier and more effective because your student brings the right stuff and willingly embraces knowledge and personal growth. Start with identifying your student’s desire level and go from there.

How can you find out if your applicant is the one you’re looking for? How can you save time during the interview process and make the right hiring decision? What are the best sales training methods? How can you retain your sales champion once you've found them?

Topics: Loyalty Employee Engagement Sales Performance Performance employee training Sales Recognition Reward Taico Incentive Services

Customer Loyalty. How to get some.

Losing a customer remains at the top of an organization's nemesis. Gaining a new customer on one hand but watching an existing customer leave you is like pouring fine wine in a glass with no bottom. Depending on the industry you are in, it takes big money and time to win a customer. Do you know what its costing you? Lets face it, keeping a customer is less expensive than finding one. Research by business consultants firm The Brookeside Group and the author of "Great or Poor" Guy Arnold, conclude that companies can boost profits by as much as 85 percent by focusing on why clients stay with you. Customer loyalty can also have the same impact as reducing operating costs by as much as 10 percent. American Express weighs in with their findings. "Consumers are willing to pay an average of 36 per cent more for a decent pub meal if the service, food and atmosphere are of a high standard." Unfortunately many larger organizations still put their bucks into huge sales and marketing initiatives but cut back, to their peril, on customer service analysis and training of employees.
When it comes to boosting customer loyalty, bigger companies don't always know better. 
The good news is that you can dramatically improve your own customer loyalty by understanding the impact your workplace culture has on customer retention.
Here we will map out some simple observations to put you on the right course toward employee engagement and customers remaining on board.

Topics: Communication Loyalty Employee Engagement Loyalty Programs Sales Performance wellness programs Performance employee training Social Engagment Tools

Designing your incentives program.

In response to requests we receive about incentive best practices, here are some ideas and general guidlines. With some simple planning and the assistance of an incentive professional, you can initiate, develop, launch and implement an effective employee sponsored corporate incentives program. At the outset I also recommend downloading our free incentive planning guide.

Topics: incentive programs Communication Employee Engagement incentive and reward solutions employee training Results incentive program

Success stories from the employee engagement, motivation archives!

Amazing how many wonderful success stories there are that illustrate the importance and effectiveness of employee engagement and recognition. Showing tangible appreciation can be a low cost or no cost initiative. Yet even today, many managers still do not understand the potential power they have in their hands that will improve performance in their workplace. Sadly, many business leaders still choose to remain blind to this fundamental principle of human behavior.

Topics: Loyalty Employee Retention Sales Performance wellness programs Performance employee training Employee Incentive Programs incentive program

Incentive Programs. Yesterday, Today and the Future!

History has not been able to re-call exactly the first use of engagement and motivation to encourage behavior. Some go back to the book of Genesis and Adam and Eve’s ousting from the Garden of Eden. As the narration goes, God tells them they must “work by the sweat of their brow” if they want to exist.  Perhaps a bit severe but who’s going to argue with God.

Topics: incentive programs sales incentive programs incentive services wellness programs employee training