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More success stories from the employee engagement archives

It’s not difficult to make the case that the ongoing financial mess on Wall Street and TARP payments to some of the country’s biggest banks have victimized smaller firms. One victim is the investment management industry. A big challenge becomes being able to assure clients they can continue to trust them with their money.

As we have emphasized in previous blogs, having a workplace that engenders a culture of respect, engagement, trust, and fairness will aid in empowering your organization to keep clients. And how do you do that?

By inspiring your most valuable asset—your employees. When individual employees feel a part of the whole, they will invest more of their efforts on your customer’s behalf. And your customers will respond positively. Often a customer’s only perception of your business comes from their interaction with your employees. That presents a wonderful opportunity for you to become remembered as the deliverer of a great brand experience. The perception of being a caring organization will resonate well within the marketplace.

The employee factor is a powerful asset you already have that can offset market conditions. So ask yourself—what is your client’s perception of your company? Is their interaction with your organization conducive to them staying? Is your customer’s recollection of their entire experience with you, at all touch points, a good one? Is your organization still cautious about implementing an employee recognition and rewards program? Do these programs really work? Here are some success stories guaranteed to reassure you of the value of employee interaction.

Companies that have embraced the power of engagement

Topics: Communication Employee Engagement Employee Retention Employee Recognition Peer to peer recognition Performance performance improvement solutions

What is a happy employee? What is an engaged employee?

Companies today want to attract and retain the best quality talent. Some of these same organizations believe the best way to do this is to offer the most enticing perks one can imagine— sauna rooms, nap areas, free lunch, paid days off, afternoon bowling, and the list goes on.

Much confusion remains among employers as to the differences between a happy worker and an engaged worker. Of course, anyone would be happy with a free lunch but the point here is that being engaged must come before being happy. They are not necessarily exclusive. They just need to be put in the right order. Your highest ideal, as an employer, is the development of a productive, creative, loyal, and passionate workforce. That will happen when you have engaged your people. The results will also affect your customer base because your engaged employees will take better care of them. Your customers, in turn, will tend to stick with you.

If you are a forward looking brand, you will have to contend with the economic uncertainty out there among consumers. No one has to tell you, the customer is always right even when they’re not. Although the level of consumer skepticism is high, this can work to your advantage if your employees are inspired to provide great customer service and experience. For example, an employee may be happy at work but not necessarily investing their energy on behalf of your organization.

When surveyed, some employees might even claim to be happy and satisfied with their job but will not hesitate to jump ship when another “opportunity” comes along. By coming to a better understanding of what it means to be happy, satisfied, and engaged, you can take intelligent steps to improve your overall workforce retention and performance.

Topics: incentive programs Rewards Communication Employee Engagement Employee Retention Employee Recognition Results engaged employee